Genesis 24

The first 11 chapters of Genesis covered a lot of ground: creation, the fall, the flood, the Tower of Babel. But as soon as you hit Genesis 12, the camera seems to go from wide-angle to a zoom lens. Whereas the first 11 chapters of the Bible covered several names and faces, the subsequent 12 chapters are focused primarily on God’s promise to one family—Abraham, Sarah, and Isaac.

Beginning in Genesis 12, we saw Abraham called out from where he was to the land that God would show him. We heard God’s promise to make Abraham a great nation that would bless all the families of the earth. We saw God doubling down on his promise when Abraham expressed his doubts. We read about Abraham’s and Sarah’s impatient attempt to fulfill God’s promise apart from God’s plan. Despite their subversive scheme, we once again saw God triple down on his promise to give them a son. We read of God finally making good on his promise in the birth of Isaac. Emboldened by the Lord’s faithfulness, we saw Abraham’s trust in the Lord on display in his willingness to sacrifice his son.

In Genesis 24, we come to the end of a deep dive into the story of Abraham, Sarah, and Isaac. And where does the story end? Nearly right back where it started. God’s promise in Genesis 12:2 was to make Abraham “a great nation,” and that promise is echoed in the blessing spoken over Rebekah, Isaac’s soon-to-be wife: “Our sister, may you become thousands of ten thousands” (Genesis 24:60).

And that’s exactly what she would do because, as I wrote in last Thursday’s devotional, God makes good on his promises. Therefore, “Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who promised is faithful” (Hebrews 10:23)

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